Category: Big Cats

Through the Lens of Shannon Wild

From her early career as a graphic designer to traveling the world as a freelance photographer/videographer for clients such as National Geographic, Australian Shannon Benson of Shannon Wild is proof positive that hard work, dedication, and passion can open doors to unique careers in wildlife conservation. Like most of things in life, though, Shannon’s success hasn’t been handed to her.

Q&A with Dylan Fryer: Never Too Young to Make a Difference

Back when he was just eight years old, Dylan Fryer knew he could make a difference for wildlife conservation. He started out small, raising money wherever he could—$100 for San Diego Zoo Global by participating in a recycling program called Cans for Critters, $500 by participating in a fundraising effort called I ___ for Wildlife (Dylan chose to read for wildlife), and so on.

Worth More Alive

At Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya, armed guards protect a northern white rhino named Sudan. Sudan is the last living male of his kind. As one of just three northern white rhinos on Earth (the other two, females, are also under protection at Ol Pejeta), Sudan is a constant reminder that rhinos are in trouble. Their greatest enemy? Poachers.

Kids Camps Empower Kenya’s Youth

From lions and giraffes to elephants and zebras, the future of Kenya’s wildlife lies in the hands of the country’s youth. To help make sure the next generation of Kenyans is prepared for this responsibility, a nonprofit organization called Ewaso Lions created the Lion Kids Camp program, which brings local children together to have fun while they learn about wildlife and discover their role in protecting the land’s natural resources.

Tigers: More Valuable Than Diamonds?

In the wake of International Tiger Day, some recent news from India suggests the nation is putting tigers and their habitat ahead of diamonds, at least for the moment. Mining company Rio Tinto is asking permission to mine for diamonds in Madhya Pradesh, a large state in central India that encompasses critical tiger habitats such as the Panna Tiger Reserve in Panna National Park. To make way for the diamond mine, Rio Tinto would need to cut down nearly half a million trees.