Category: Mammals (Terrestrial)

Elephants and Bees

Majestic. Powerful. Awe-inspiring. Intelligent. These are just a few of the words that may come to mind when you think of a fully grown African or Asian elephant. But for farmers who are trying to make a living in places where elephants also roam, these iconic mammals can be more like giant pests.

The Birds and the Bees

If you’ve seen a butterfly land on a flower, you mostly likely witnessed something amazing—pollination, the transfer of pollen from one plant to another for fertilization. Since plants can’t get up and pollinate themselves, pollinators like birds, bees, butterflies, bats, and small mammals do it for them.

Through the Lens of Shannon Wild

From her early career as a graphic designer to traveling the world as a freelance photographer/videographer for clients such as National Geographic, Australian Shannon Benson of Shannon Wild is proof positive that hard work, dedication, and passion can open doors to unique careers in wildlife conservation. Like most of things in life, though, Shannon’s success hasn’t been handed to her.

‘Tis the Season: Wonderfully Wintery Creatures

‘Tis the season for freshly fallen snow, warm blankets, and holiday cheer (and scraping ice from car windshields). For humans in the northern hemisphere, it’s the time of year for sledding and ice skating, cookie baking and ugly sweater parties, and cuddling up by the fireplace to watch classic movies. Unlike humans, many animal species—particularly in Arctic regions—are simply built for wintery conditions. Some of them even seem to embody the season itself (ahem, reindeer). Grab a cup of hot cocoa, and let’s take a look at just a few of these wonderfully wintery creatures.

Q&A with Dylan Fryer: Never Too Young to Make a Difference

Back when he was just eight years old, Dylan Fryer knew he could make a difference for wildlife conservation. He started out small, raising money wherever he could—$100 for San Diego Zoo Global by participating in a recycling program called Cans for Critters, $500 by participating in a fundraising effort called I ___ for Wildlife (Dylan chose to read for wildlife), and so on.

Seeing Stripes

Along with pandas, penguins, orcas, and skunks, zebras are well-known for their striking black-and-white coloration. But why do they have stripes in the first place? The short answer from the scientific community is: We don’t really know. But by asking questions and seeking answers through research, the scientific community is getting closer to the truth and learning more about zebras in the process.

Celebrating Election Day Animals

Back in the 1800s, a cartoonist named Thomas Nast helped popularize the use of a donkey and an elephant to symbolize the two major political parties in America—Democrats and Republicans. Tomorrow is Election Day, and, to celebrate, we’re completely ignoring presidential candidates, political platforms, and scandals. Instead, we’re highlighting the animals that front the Democratic and Republican parties. Enjoy this break from the mayhem!

Expecto Patronum! Patronus Spotlight: Hedgehog

In the book Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter, a young wizard attending Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, conjures a powerful defensive charm called a Patronus to save the life of his godfather. In Rowling’s fictional world, a Patronus charm takes the form of an animal that in some way or another reflects the witch or wizard who cast it.

Worth More Alive

At Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya, armed guards protect a northern white rhino named Sudan. Sudan is the last living male of his kind. As one of just three northern white rhinos on Earth (the other two, females, are also under protection at Ol Pejeta), Sudan is a constant reminder that rhinos are in trouble. Their greatest enemy? Poachers.